September is Sickle Cell Awareness Month

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September is Sickle Cell Awareness Month

Virginia Blood Services is committed to working to improve patient care for sickle cell patients in the communities we serve.

Did you know?

  • Our hospitals require access to specific blood types that match the sickle cell patient’s individual needs in order to help minimize the risks and reactions of repeated transfusions.
  • Individuals with sickle cell trait can qualify to serve as a blood donor just like any other potential blood donors.

By making a blood donation you join Virginia Blood Services’s efforts to support life and help give sickle cell patients in our community the blood products they need. Your donation gives these courageous patients a chance at a better quality of life.

Be the giving type. Together, we can provide strength, hope and courage for local patients in need. 

host_a_drive_noBkgd   donate_blood_noBkgd

 

 

What Is Sickle Cell Anemia?

Sickle cell anemia (uh-NEE-me-uh) is the most common form of sickle cell disease (SCD). SCD is a serious disorder in which the body makes sickle-shaped red blood cells. “Sickle-shaped” means that the red blood cells are shaped like a crescent.

Normal red blood cells are disc-shaped and look like doughnuts without holes in the center. They move easily through your blood vessels. Red blood cells contain an iron-rich protein called hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin). This protein carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body.

Sickle cells contain abnormal hemoglobin called sickle hemoglobin or hemoglobin S. Sickle hemoglobin causes the cells to develop a sickle, or crescent, shape. Sickle cells are stiff and sticky. They tend to block blood flow in the blood vessels of the limbs and organs. Blocked blood flow can cause pain and organ damage. It can also raise the risk for infection.

Overview

Sickle cell anemia is one type of anemia. Anemia is a condition in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood cells. This condition also can occur if your red blood cells don’t contain enough hemoglobin.

Red blood cells are made in the spongy marrow inside the larger bones of the body. Bone marrow is always making new red blood cells to replace old ones. Normal red blood cells live about 120 days in the bloodstream and then die. They carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body.

In sickle cell anemia, the abnormal sickle cells usually die after only about 10 to 20 days. The bone marrow can’t make new red blood cells fast enough to replace the dying ones.

Sickle cell anemia is an inherited, lifelong disease. People who have the disease are born with it. They inherit two genes for sickle hemoglobin—one from each parent.

People who inherit a sickle hemoglobin gene from one parent and a normal gene from the other parent have a condition called sickle cell trait.

Sickle cell trait is different than sickle cell anemia. People who have sickle cell trait don’t have the disease. Like people who have sickle cell anemia, people who have sickle cell trait can pass the sickle hemoglobin gene to their children.

What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia?

Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disease. People who have the disease inherit two genes for sickle hemoglobin—one from each parent.

Sickle hemoglobin causes red blood cells to develop a sickle, or crescent, shape. Sickle cells are stiff and sticky. They tend to block blood flow in the blood vessels of the limbs and organs. Blocked blood flow can cause pain and organ damage. It can also raise the risk for infection.

Sickle Cell Trait

People who inherit a sickle hemoglobin gene from one parent and a normal gene from the other parent have sickle cell trait. Their bodies make both sickle hemoglobin and normal hemoglobin.

People who have sickle cell trait usually have few, if any, symptoms and lead normal lives. However, some people may have medical complications.  They can pass the sickle hemoglobin gene to their children.

Who Is at Risk for Sickle Cell Anemia?

Sickle cell anemia is most common in people whose families come from Africa, South or Central America (especially Panama), Caribbean islands, Mediterranean countries (such as Turkey, Greece, and Italy), India, and Saudi Arabia.

In the United States, it’s estimated that sickle cell anemia affects 70,000–100,000 people, mainly African Americans. The disease occurs in about 1 out of every 500 African American births. Sickle cell anemia also affects Hispanic Americans. The disease occurs in more than 1 out of every 36,000 Hispanic American births.  More than 2 million Americans have sickle cell trait. The condition occurs in about 1 in 12 African Americans.

Outlook

Sickle cell anemia has no widely available cure. However, treatments to improve the anemia and lower complications can help with the symptoms and complications of the disease in both children and adults. Blood and marrow stem cell transplants may offer a cure for a small number of people.

Over the past 100 years, doctors have learned a great deal about sickle cell anemia. They know its causes, how it affects the body, and how to treat many of its complications.

Sickle cell anemia varies from person to person. Some people who have the disease have chronic (long-term) pain or fatigue (tiredness). However, with proper care and treatment, many people who have the disease can have improved quality of life and reasonable health much of the time.  Because of improved treatments and care, people who have sickle cell anemia are now living longer.

NIH: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sca/

 

Sickle Cell Awareness Drives – all participating donors will receive a limited edition Sickle Cell Awareness t-shirt!SCA_TeeShirt copy

9/1/16

Fontaine Research Park (Charlottesville); 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.

 

9/4/16

Cedar Street Baptist; 7:30 a. m.- 11 a.m.

 

9/5/16

In honor of Jasmine China (501 Nine Mile Rd.); 10 a. m.- 4 p.m.

 

9/7/16

Richard Bland College; 11 a.m.- 5 p.m.

VWCC (3096 Colonial Ave, Roanoke); 11 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

 

9/17/16

Faith 4 A Cure – Historic Lawson Building (Roanoke); 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.

 

9/18/16

Mount Olive Baptist Church; 9:30 a. m.- 2:30 p.m.

 

9/19/16

Shiloh Baptist; 4 p.m.- 8 p.m.

 

9/23/16

T-Mobile (100 Westgate Parkway); 12 p.m.- 4 p.m.

 

9/24/16

In Honor of Scoobie; 11 a.m.- 2 p.m.

Antioch Baptist Church; 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

 

9/26/16

Four Points by Sheraton (Midlothian) – Sponsored by Haley Buick GMC; 12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

 

9/28/16

Brandermill Woods; 10 a.m.- 1 p.m.